Saturday, May 23, 2009

Resurrection Politics

The classic Christian doctrine, therefore, is actually far more powerful and revolutionary than the Platonic one. It was people who believed robustly in the resurrection, not people who compromised and went in for mere spiritualized survival, who stood up against Caesar in the first centuries of the Christian era. A piety that sees death as the moment of "going home at last," the time when we are "called to God's eternal peace," has no quarrel with power-mongers who want to carve up the world to suit their own ends. Resurrection, by contrast, has always gone with a strong view of God's justice and God as the good creator. Those twin beliefs give rise not to a meek acquiescence to injustice in the world but to a robust determination to oppose it. English evangelicals gave up believing in the urgent imperative to improve society (such as we find with Wilberforce in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries) about the same time that they gave up believing robustly in the resurrection and settled for a disembodied heaven instead.

N. T. Wright, Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church

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2 Comments:

Blogger de_kerinchi said...

Thank you so much!!! I love all your blogs! With good writing and Nice writing style, Keep up the good work.. Looking forward to reading more from you.. ;-)

Thursday, July 02, 2009 11:41:00 PM  
Anonymous germangirl said...

great blog

Friday, August 28, 2009 2:31:00 AM  

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